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staff photoJarrell, Mark
Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy
2032 LDMC • +12255787528+12255788271 • email address
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Faculty

staff photoChen, Bin
Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry
email address
Among the greatest challenges for molecular simulation are the limited time and spatial scales that can be afforded using the current computer technology and simulation algorithms, especially when applied to complex biochemical problems. The goals of our research are to greatly expand the territory accessible to molecular simulation by circumventing these constraints and to develop an atom-based approach that can be used as a practical tool to provide important molecular-level information for long time-scale events of chemical, biological, and environmental interest. This research direction is fueled by our recent development of an aggregation-volume-bias Monte Carlo based technique that led to a series of successful studies of rare vapor-liquid nucleation events. Given that nucleation can be viewed as a common theme between the long time-scale events involved in phase transitions and those occurring in a broad range of biochemical systems (such as self-assembly and folding) due to the strong resemblance of their thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, we see an opportunity to extend the methodology developed here to a wide range of challenging long time-scale problems. Some of this work has been featured as cover-pages of both June 14, 2007 and January 28, 2008 issues of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, and both June 18, 2009 and September 2, 2010 issues of Journal of Physical Chemistry C.
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staff photoBrowne, Dana
Associate Chair and Professor of Physics
Department of Physics & Astronomy
+1 225 578 6843 • email address
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staff photoNikitopoulos, Dimitris
Professor and Chair
Department of Mechanical Engineering
2068 LDMC • email address
Dimitris Nikitopoulos is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. His research interests include turbulent dispersed two-phase flows, spray and mist-systems, fire suppression, micro-fluidics, internal turbine blade cooling, non-linear stability analysis, and direct numerical simulations.
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staff photoHung, Francisco
Cain Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
2056 LDMC • 225-578-3546 • email address
Web page
In our research we investigate the properties of different soft matter systems at the molecular level, using computational modeling and molecular simulation. Our computer simulations can provide molecular-level information that might be difficult or impossible to capture in experiments. Our research is relevant to applications in energy, nanomaterials and nanotechnology, and biomolecular and environmental studies. Current areas of interest are molecular modeling of ionic liquids confined in nanoporous materials; manipulation, alignment, and organization of carbon nanotubes and other anisotropic particles using liquid crystals; adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and reactive oxygen species (ROSs) on water and ice surfaces; and adsorption of hydrocarbons and dispersants on atmospheric air/salt water interfaces.
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staff photoVoyiadjis, George
Boyd Professor and Chair
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
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staff photoWaldrop, Grover
Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
225-578-5209 • email address
Dr. Waldrop's laboratory focuses on the catalytic mechanisms of enzymes from a kinetic, chemical and structural perspective. Currently, the laboratory is focusing on two enzymes both of which have medical relevance. One enzyme is acetyl CoA carboxylase, which catalyzes the committed and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis in all animals, plants and bacteria. This enzyme is a target for antibiotics and anti-obesity agents. Acetyl CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme and consists of three components: (1) biotin carboxylase, (2) biotin carboxyl carrier protein, which contains the biotin cofactor and (3) carboxyltransferase. The other enzyme under investigation is GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase, which catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of fucose. This enzyme is a target for anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-metastatic agents. To study the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes we use a variety of mechanistic techniques including steady-state and rapid reaction kinetics, inhibitor design, isotope effects and site-directed mutagenesis. Structural analyses are carried out by x-ray crystallography.
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staff photoWang, Jianwei
Assistant Professor
Department of Geology & Geophysics
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staff photoKarki, Bijaya
Professor; McDermott Endowed Professor
Chair - Division of Computer Science and Engineering
2130 LDMC • +1 225 518 3197 • email address
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staff photoLopata, Kenneth
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry
2050 LDMC • email address
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staff photoButler, Les
Professor
Department of Chemistry
email address
Les Butler received his BS (1977) from the University of Arkansas, then studied inorganic chemistry with Prof. Ted Brown at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His PhD (1981) research was the construction of a novel solid-state NMR spectrometer and its applications to inorganic materials. Postdoctoral research (1981-93) in photochemistry and solid-state chemistry was done at CalTech with Prof. Harry Gray. He started at LSU as an assistant professor in 1983. His group built several solid-state NMR spectrometers and used magnet facilities at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Los Alamos to study organometallic complexes, catalysts, polymer blends, biological samples, and environmental samples. He spent two years at the National Science Foundation (2001-02) as a program officer in chemistry. Now, his research program has moved in 3D+ imaging with X-ray and neutrons, mostly in materials science and polymer blends.
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staff photoLipton, Robert
S.B. Barton Professor
Department of Mathematics
+1 225 578 1665 • email address
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staff photoBrylinski, Michal
Assistant Professor, Deparment of Biological Sciences
2054 LDMC • +1 225 578 2601 • email address
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staff photoKhonsari, Michael
Dow Chemical Endowed Chair and Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
+1 225 578 9192 • email address
Dr Khonsari earned a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. At LSU he holds the Dow Chemical Endowed Chair in the Department of Mechanical Engineering where he is also the Director of the Center for Rotating Machinery. His research interests are in friction, lubrication and wear of machinery, machinery performance analysis, numerical analysis and heat transfer. Dr Khonsari serves as the EPSCoR Project Director in Sponsored Programs for the Louisiana Board of Regents.
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staff photoMoldovan, Dorel
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
2068 LDMC • +1 225 578 6488 • email address
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staff photoMoreno, Juana
Associate Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy
2034 LDMC • 225-578-7434 • email address
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staff photoHall, Randall
Professor
Dominican University of California - Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
+1 225 578 3472 • email address
Web page
Randall Hall is the Dr. Lilliam L.Y. Wang Yin Endowed Professor in Chemistry at Dominican University of California. He also holds an Emeritus Professor position in the Department of Chemistry at LSU and an Adjunct Professor position at the LSU Center for Computation & Technology. He obtained his B.S. from U.C. Berkeley and his Ph.D. for Columbia University. He worked as a postdoctoral associate at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign before joining the faculty at LSU in 1986.
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staff photoDaniels-Race, Theda
Michel B. Voorhies Distinguished Professor
Professor, Division of Electrical and Computer Engineering
2164 LDMC • +12255788912+12255785623 • email address
Theda Daniels-Race is the Michel B. Voorhies Distinguished Professor in the Division of Electrical and Computer Engineering. She received her PhD from Cornell University, and before joining the LSU faculty, she was responsible for the design and development of Duke University's first molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) laboratory. She is an expert in the expitaxial growth and characterization of compound semiconductor nanostructures.
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Staff

staff photoKim, Dr. Joohyun
IT Consultant
2015 LDMC • +1 225 578 6833 • email address
Joohyun Kim is a research staff in Cyberinfrastructure Development (CyD) group, CCT and Louisiana Biomedical Research Network (LBRN) Bioinformatics/Biocomputing Core (BBC) member. He received his Ph.D in Physical Chemistry from Seoul National University (Korea) and completed postdoctoral trainings at the NIMC (Japan), Boston University, UIC, and UIUC (NCSA).Current research and research support areas include Science Gateway development for life sciences and Structural Bioinformatics
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staff photoKim, Dr. Nayong
Research Scientist
IT Consultant
2017 LDMC • +1 225 578 5486 • email address
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