LOG IN TO MyLSU
Home

(Source:  HPCwire

In response to the multiple disasters that have hit Japan, starting with March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, the world has responded with an outpouring of support. An article from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) TeraGrid cites the importance of reaching out to Japan's science and research sector:

"In addition to the humanitarian crisis, Japan's industrial and research communities have been affected which has global impact. Many of the products we use in our daily lives come from factories that were destroyed. Japan's intellectual contribution to the global research community has been interrupted as the systems many relied on to do their work were demolished. Much collaboration between Japanese and U.S. research groups across all domains of science has ground to a halt."

Here are some of the ways that TeraGrid institutions are helping:

  • The Keeneland Project at Georgia Tech (GT) is looking at ways to provide computing and storage resources to Tokyo Tech researchers, so they will be able to continue their important work.
  • Indiana University (IU) staff have been studying the earthquake and tsunami data in an attempt to better understand the events.
  • With help from volunteers, a Louisiana State University professor along with Japanese colleagues from several institutions collaborated a large-scale tsunami simulation.
  • San Diego Supercomputer Center is providing computing cycles and storage to colleagues from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology and Tokyo Institute of Technology so the researchers can analyze satellite data related to the disaster.
  • The Texas Advanced Computing Center's Lonestar4 cycles were provided to Japanese researchers from the University of Tokyo, and additional Japanese schools, to model the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, as well as to map the path of the nuclear radiation.

TeraGrid Program Director Barry Schneider commented on the research partnerships:

"This isn't the first time our TeraGrid family took the initiative to help in a crisis. Hopefully their efforts will help Japanese researchers return to some sense of normality, allow the world to gain a better understanding of earthquakes and tsunamis in general, and prevent future loss. It's a great example of how the U.S. investment in science contributes to global scientific, social, and economic progress."

Publish Date: 
04-28-2011